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Category Archives: Wildlife Management

An Adventure of the Vocal Quartet

A children’s story from Fraser Island (K’gari)

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Celebrating K’gari through pictures!

IMG_8949As part of Fraser Island (K’gari’s) World Heritage 25th Anniversary celebrations the Queensland Government ran a photo competition called ‘Snap Up Paradise.’  The competition resulted in over 300 incredible entries, some of which have been reproduced in a limited edition calendar for 2019, as well as being featured in the latest issue of the Wildlife Australia magazine – Australia’s leading wildlife magazine since 1963.

Wildlife Australia is not only informative, entertaining and visually stunning, it is also on a mission to protect wildlife, influence choices and engage communities. Your subscription helps: all proceeds fund the crucial conservation work of Wildlife Queensland.WAM-cover-pic-for-web-3-600x600

Wildlife Australia is running a special offer for all subscriptions purchased before 31 January, you will get a free copy of this incredible calendar for yourself (or a friend if it’s a gift).

Subscriptions for the year are only $47 (including postage and GST) in Australia or $70 worldwide.  So this is a great opportunity for you to share your love of K’gari worldwide with a gift that will last an entire year.

To subscribe, please click here.

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Utilisation of stranded marine fauna washed ashore on K’gari (Fraser Island), Australia, by dingoes

For those of you interested in keeping up with current research, this paper was recently published in the Australian Journal of Zoology by Linda Behrendorff, Luke K.-P. Leung and Benjamin L. Allen. (more…)

The Tale of a Drunk Dingo!

We know that dingoes eat figs to supplement their diet. But what happens when they have a belly-full of fermenting fruit?  Can they over-imbibe and become inebriated like the parrots?  It seems they can. They might stagger around a bit, but at least they don’t fall out of trees! (more…)

Seasonal Migration… and those that stay

It’s that time again! The humpback whale annual migration is heading south and the marine turtle courting and breeding season begins – ­where adult courting males and nesting females return to their birthplace from areas hundreds of kilometres abroad.

While these migratory breeding cycles increase whale and turtle populations, sadly, some individuals remain and become part of the island’s food-web providing extra sustenance for terrestrial scavengers including the island’s apex predators. (more…)

Watch Out For Rat Birds!

Please be on the lookout for Indian myna birds (or if you have watched “cloudy with a chance of meatballs”- Ratbirds) as several have been sighted on Fraser Island.  (more…)

Where Have All The Birds Gone?

In the last FINIA newsletter, FIDO’s John Sinclair raised concerns about the apparent diminishing number of birds on Fraser Island.  He points to the evidence provided by a group of bird watchers who recorded 65 species of birds in a trip across the island in a 24-hour period in November 1968.  John said that over five days at Easter on the island this year he managed to see or hear only 20 species through the bush and on the beach.

John asked the question: where have the island’s birds gone? Without being too smart, I could say … to the Anderson bird baths at Eurong. (more…)

Eyes All Around – ‘SNAP’ gotcha!

Trail cameras are an integral part of protected area management throughout the world and a useful tool where resources for field observations are limited. Within the Great Sandy National Park, cameras are utilised and applied to the management of threatened fauna species, feral animal activity, compliance and dingo conservation. The process of going through the images can be long and at times surprising, but the rewards are worth it. (more…)

This one’s for the birds…

During the first field trip by the Maryborough and Bundaberg Wildlife Branches to Fraser Island (K’gari) in November 1968, in 24 hours the group positively identified 65 species of birds.  Admittedly, the trip was led by outstanding naturalist and keen birdo, Eric Zillman.

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The final straw – a subject for deflation

Stranded wildlife is continually washed up on coastal and island regions throughout the state and a routine part of coastal ranger business. A variety of species, from marine mammals, turtles and birds, are routinely recorded by QPWS staff and volunteers. In most instances this allows for reporting of cause and trends to advise management of best possible practice and influence legislation, such as concerning go slow zones and fisheries.

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