Home » Fraser Coast Regional Council » Autumn’s Worst Weeds!

Autumn’s Worst Weeds!

Have you noticed plants in your gardens escaping and spreading into other parts of your garden or neighbourhood? You can help stop this spread by removing them wherever you see them and planting better alternatives that benefit the gardens diversity and reduce the possibility of weedy plants invading.

Check the health of plants before bringing into your garden or you may spread things like Myrtle rust which is now prevalent on the Fraser Coast. For further details about this rust contact your local nursery, Council or DPI&F.

Mickey Mouse plant is flowering and fruiting now

Mickey Mouse plant is flowering and fruiting now

Mickey Mouse plant (Ochna serrulata) Flowering now!

Environmental Weed Declared under Local Law No. 3 (2010) for Fraser Island ONLY.

Origin: Native to Africa. Invades undisturbed native bushland and can become dense stands even in shady areas.

Description: Shrub to 2m with narrow glossy leaves and finely serrated wavy margins. Flowers in spring /summer and have five yellow petals which drop leaving five red sepals surrounding green to black pea sized seeds that’s spread by birds.

Control: Hand remove when young as has deep taproot or cut and paste with a registered herbicide.

Garden alternatives: Lemon scented tea tree (Leptospermum liversidgei), Hop bush (Dodonea triquetra)

Brazillian Cherry (Eugenia uniflora) Flowering now!

Brazilian Cherry has a delicious fruit - but is totally unsuitable for Fraser Island and quickly can become a weed

Brazilian Cherry has a delicious fruit – but is totally unsuitable for Fraser Island and quickly can become a weed

Environmental Weed

Alternative Name(s): Eugenia brasiliana, Surinam Cherry.

Origin: Native to northern Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay. Now naturalised in many tropical and sub-tropical countries around the world.

Description: Tree or shrub to 3-5 m, glossy dark green ovate leaves, young growth bronze/pink, aromatic when crushed. White flowers with prominent white stamens, autumn to spring. Edible fleshy fruit which have 7- or 8-ribs ripens to dark red.

Dispersal: Spread by animal-dispersed seed.

Control: Removal of the plant should be done before the fruit ripens, especially if the material is to be chipped or mulched. Larger plants may require chemical treatment.

Garden Alternatives: Midyim (Austromyrtus dulcis), Fringed Wattle (Acacia fimbriata subsp. perangusta), Blue Tongue (Melastoma malabathricum)

Coastal Morning Glory with their distinctive flowers can smother the canopy of other trees

Coastal Morning Glory with their distinctive flowers can smother the canopy of other trees

Coastal Morning Glory (Ipomea cairica)

Environmental Weed Declared under Local Law No. 3 (2010) for FRASER ISLAND ONLY

Alternative Name(s): Mile-A-Minute

Origin: Probably native of tropical areas of Africa and Asia although it’s native range now obscure. Garden escape and localised major weed of the coastal regions of NSW and Queensland, especially along creeks.

Flowers/Seedhead: Surrounded by sepals 0.4–0.8 cm long, stamens and style included in flower tube. Flowers most of year.

Description: This vine is a perennial herb with twining and trailing stems. Roots tuberous and plant rooting at nodes. Plants hairless. Leaves round in outline, 3–10 cm long and wide, leaf stalk 2–6 cm long. Inflorescence axillary, 1–3 flowered. Capsule almost globe-shaped, 9–12 mm wide, with 2 chambers, splitting into 4 valves, contains up to 4 seeds. Seeds dark brown to black, 5–6 mm long, flattened ovoid, hairy with pale brown long hairs on outer ridges.

Distinguishing features: Distinguished by deeply 5-segmented leaves with basal segments often lobed; funnel-shaped violet (rarely white) joined petals 3.5–6 cm long, 6–8 cm wide, with darker violet hairless mid-petal bands, throat usually darker.

Dispersal: Spread by seed and locally by spreading stems.

Control: Physical removal using a brush hook or similar tool. Take care to dig out and remove the crown and roots of the plant to prevent regrowth. Larger infestations may require the use of herbicides.

Garden Alternatives: Native hoya (Hoya australis), Wombat berry (Eustrephus latifolius), Native lilac (Hardenbergia violaceae)

Before using any herbicide always read the label carefully and apply strictly in accordance with directions on the label.

Keep an eye out for our officers inspecting areas throughout the region and happy weeding!

Declared, local law and environmental plants will be featured in the coming articles. For further information visit Council website www.frasercoast.qld.gov.au

 Information provided by Juliet Musgrave, Fraser Coast Regional Council


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